Mark Goodger

Encyclopaedia

Here we try to provide some provenance for the makers/retailers of each fabulous piece in our collection. This page offers an insight into the history of the item and information about the company that made/sold it. Here, you will find authentic information on some big names like Asprey, Hukin & Heath, and Lalique. Maybe you are curious about a lesser-known maker? Then take a glance through our Encyclopaedia. This section of the website will constantly evolve, as we are regularly updating the website with new stock – so keep your eyes open for updates!

A C. A Charlent

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Aaron Lufkin Dennison

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Adie Brothers Ltd

Adie Brothers was a Birmingham based silversmith located on Frederick Street in 1902. They later became Adie Brothers Ltd and registered new hallmarks in 1922. Best known for making vanity cases but they made a wide range silver serving items. In the late 1960's Aide Brothers Ltd became part of British Silverware, which closed in 1968.

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Alfred Dunhill

Alfred Dunhill was Born September 30th 1872. From 1890 Dunhill ran a company that sold motoring accessories through mail order under the name Dunhill's Motorities. In 1902 he opened a shop on Conduit Street, Mayfair which sold clothing and accessories to chauffeurs and their employers. In 1904 he developed the “windshield pipe”, which would allow motorists to smoke whilst driving, and went on to open a tobacconists in St. James in 1907. The shop offered tailored tobacco blends and its success meant that Dunhill could expand to shops in New York and Paris in the 1920's. With his international ambitions Dunhill created a modern luxury goods market. In 1921 the company received its first royal warrant, as a tobacconist to Edward Prince of Wales. Dunhill also supplied Winston Churchill and Siegfried Sassoon. In 1924 Dunhill launched the “Unique Lighter” which was the world's first lighter that could be operated with one hand. Dunhill passed the chairmanship of the company to his son Alfred Henry in 1928.

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Alphonse Tahan

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Andersen & Søhoel

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Andrew Barrett & Sons

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Army & Navy Co

Army & Navy was governed by a board of directors, many of whom were retired Army & Navy officers. The Army & Navy Co-operative Society Ltd was incorporated in 1871, It was formed to supply general domestic items at the lowest remunerative rate to its members. The Society Leased a portion of a distillery premises on Victoria Street, London. The store opened in early 1872 selling groceries. Soon after they were supplying stationery, fancy goods and tailoring and by the end of 1873 the had added a chemists and gun department. The business soon needed to expand so they purchased another warehouse in Johnson Place. By 1786 the business had outgrown its premises so they leased more of the distillery and moved the warehouse from Johnson Place to a new location on Ranelagh Road and was now offering banking to its members. In 1878 they had opened stores in Paris and Leipzig. In 1881 the society purchase the rest of the distillery and had the whole sight open by 1882. With continual growth stores were opened in plymouth and Bombay, India. In 1891 another store was opened in Karachi. The success in India continued through the early 1900's and by 1930 the society had stores in Kolkota, New Dehli, Shimla and Ranchi. However, the business was greatly impacted by the First World Ware which saw trade suffer. This impact was softened in part by a contract from the War Office. After the war the society was hit by staff strikes, but this didn't slow the development of its Victoria Street site. Then came the Second World War which hit the company hard with two sites being damaged during bombing, including the plymouth depot which was completely destroyed. Trading difficulties were exaggerated after the war when India gained independence in 1947. The last colonial store closed in 1952. With the closure of the stores in India they focused their attention on expanded the UK businesses and they started buying up companies all over the country. They were also focusing on building new stores and expanding their sites in Guilford, Chichester, Dorchester and Wolverhampton. In 1973 they began work on replacing the Victoria Street site and the building was completed in 1977. However in 1973 while work had commenced, Army & navy stores was purchased by House of Fraser. The business was liquidated soon after.

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Asprey of London

Asprey was established in 1781 by William Asprey, and was originally set up to be a silk printing business, but soon became a luxury emporium. Located in central London, Asprey advertised 'articles of exclusive design and high quality, whether for personal adornment or personal accompaniment and to endow with richness and beauty the table and homes of people of refinement and discernment.' As the business grew the company acquired several manufacturing facilities and hired silversmiths, goldsmiths, jewelers and watchmakers including Ernest Betjeman. In 1859 Asprey bought Edwards, a Royal Warrant holder and award winning dressing case maker. In 1862 Asprey was granted its first Royal Warrant by Queen Victoria and the company enjoyed a long relationship with various members of the British Royal Family.

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Austin of Dublin

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BACCARAT

Baccarat is a manufacturer of fine crystal in France. Founded in 1764 when King Louis XV of France gave permission to found a glassworks in the town Baccarat in Lorraine, eastern France. In 1823 Baccarat received its first royal commission and would continue to produce items for heads of state all across the world. Baccarat is still manufacturing today.

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BARKER BROTHERS

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Bayley & Blew

William Bayley was listed as a perfumer at 17 Cockspur street London in 1779. In 1784 at the same address the firm was listed as Bayley & Lowe. Then from 1799 to 1885 the firm was listed as Bayley Son & Blew. In addition to the manufacturing perfume the company also made small cabinets and writing slopes. In the 1885 London commercial directory they were listed as perfumers and dressing case makers to the Royal Family and Foreign Courts.

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Brockwell & Son

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Brownett & Rose

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Bruce Russell

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Chapmens Patent

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Charles Aldridge

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Charles Charles Boyton

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Christian Dior

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Christofle

In 1830 Charles Christofle became the manager of a Jewellery Workshop which belonged to his wife's family. Producing fine silver flatware and home accessories created by many famous artists and designers including Antoine Perrin, Man Ray, Jean Cocteau, Gio Ponti, Andrée Putman, Martin Szekely, Ito Morabito and Richard Hutten. Today the company is still owned by the Christofle family.

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Classic Stable

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Cornelius Desormeaux Saunders & James Francis Hollings Shepard

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Daniel & Arter

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David Edwards

David Edwards of 21 King Street, Bloomsbury Square was Writing Box and Case maker to the Royal family and inventor of the patent military travelling case. He also made tea chests, jewellery boxes, sewing boxes and canteen cases of the highest quality. He and his brother Thomas were also known to have worked from James Street and Orange Street. Edwards was known for using the highest quality timbers, intricate inlaid brass, decorative handles and complex mechanisms for secret compartments. He was bought out by Asprey in 1859 and had two royal warrants from King George IV and Queen Victoria.

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Deakin & Francis Ltd

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Douglas Clock Co

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E. S. Barnsley & Co

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Edmund Nye

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Edward Dobson

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Edward Junior

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Eyre & Co Ltd

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FINNIGANS LTD

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Frances Douglas

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Frank Cobb

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Friedrich Ludwig Hausburg

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G Betjemann & Sons

George Betjemann started as an apprentice cabinet maker from a young age working for his Father in Law. In 1848, his two sons George William Betjemann and John Betjemann joined him under apprenticeships until 1846 when George William Betjemann started his own business with his two sons. In 1859 George moved to a new premises on Pentonville road, London. This was when the business became known as 'Betjemann & Sons'. John Betjemann was grandfather of the later famous poet laureate Sir John Betjemann.

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G. Marshall & Co Chemists

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Garrard & Co

The company known as Garrard was founded by George Wikes. He set up business in Threadneedle Street, London 1722 and later moved to Panton Street in 1735. Garrards was known as a provider of jewellery and luxury items to aristocratic patrons. Robert Garrard became a partner in 1972 and ended up taking sole control in 1802 with his three sons. In 1843 Queens Victoria appointed Garrard the position of Crown Jewellers, which lead to the firm making numerous pieces os jewellery and silverware for the Royal Family. The position also included the upkeep of the Crown Jewels.

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George & Thomas Seddon

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George Henry Cowell

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Gibson & Co Ltd

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Gillows

Robert Gillow of Lancashire was an apprentice joiner and cabinet maker. He joined the Sattersthwaite family on a journey to the west indies as a ship carpenter. Whilst in Jamaica he developed a strong interest in Mahogany and returned, with samples of the wood, to Lancaster 1720. This may have been the first time Mahogany was imported to England. In 1730 he founded the luxury furniture and furnishings firm 'Gillow of Lancashire'. The firm soon gained a reputation for supplying the highest quality furniture and furnishings to the wealthiest families in the country.

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Goldsmiths & Silversmiths Co Ltd

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GORHAM MANUFACTURING CO

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Halstaff and Hannaford

William Halstaff of 68 Margeret Street, Cavendish Square, London started manufacturing dressing cases in 1825. In 1842 he went into business with Thomas Charless Hannaford. They worked from Regent Street, London, calling themselves Halstaff & Hannaford, making ladies' work boxes, writing boxes and dressing cases until 1898.

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HAMILTON & CO

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Hawksworth, Eyre & Co Ltd

Charles Hawksworth and John Eyre succeeded Blagden, Hogson & Co from Old Sheffield Plate manufacturers in 1821. In 1833 they founded Hawksworth, Eyre & Co at White Rails, Sheffield where they registered their first hallmark as "plate workers" in July 1833.

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Henry Clay

Henry Clay was an assistant to one of the pioneers in papier mache by the name of John Baskerville who started to imitate the highly polished items, that were being imported from Japan, using lacquered papier mache. Which would become known as 'japanning'. By 1772 Clay had learned enough to start up his own business and in the same year patented a new process for making 'paper ware' which involved sheets of paper being soaked in paste and pressed together on a plate. Once separated from the plate they were baked in a hot stove to remove any flexibility, whilst at the same time being coated in varnish or oil. The final product was used like wood, and once coated with colour and oils could be polished to a high shine. Around 1785 Henry Clay acquired a retail premises in London's Covent Garden. George III was one of his patrons by 1792 and Clay adopted the title 'Japanner to His Majesty.'

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Henry John Batson & Albert Edward Batson

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Henry Lewis

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Henry Mathews

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Horton & Allday

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Houghton & Gun

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Hukin & Heath

Silversmiths and electroplaters of Birmingham, established by Jonathan Wilson Hukin and John Thomas Heath, who registered London marks in 1879. When Hukin retired in 1881 the partnership continued with Heath and J. H. Middleton. The firm's association with Dr. Christopher Dresser began in 1877; the first registered design dates from 1878, and others were entered up to 1881. Dresser's designs were launched at the opening of the firm's showrooms in Charterhouse Street in August 1879. Some of Dresser’s metalwork designs are still in production today.

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J. C. Vickery

James Collard Vickery his Partner Arthur Thomas Hobbs purchased a long established business of William Griggs, a bookseller at 183 Regent Street London in 1890 and expanded the companies stock to include jewellery and dressing cases. In 1891 the partnership dissolved and Vickery carried on the business on his own and in 1900 expanded the company into 179 and 181 Regent street and obtained several royal warrants. The business was acquired by James Walker Ltd in the late 1930's

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J.A. Henckels

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J.J.Taylor

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Jacques Adnet

Jacques Adnet, born April 1900, was a French art deco modernist designer. Growing up in the 20th century he studied at the municipal school of design in Auxerre. His designs focus on functionality and simplicity which made him an icon of luxurious French Modernism. Even with their simple designs many of his pieces are easily recognisable.

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Jacques Biny

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James Dougall

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James Thornton

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Jennens & Bettridge

Aaron Jennens and T.H. Bettridge acquired Henry Clays workshops in 1816 and continued the manufacture papier mache items until 1864. They were based in Birmingham, but opened branches in London and eventually Paris and New York.

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Jenner & Knewstub

Originally located at 33 James’ Street, London after being established in 1856 by Frederick Jenner and Fabian James Knewstub. After having their work displayed at international exhibitions they soon obtained royal warrants for queen Victoria and the Russian royal family. The company went into liquidation in 1889 and were absorbed by Webster & Co but retained the name Jenner & Knewstub as a limited company.

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John & William Barnard

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John Denzilow

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John Flinn

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John Grinsell & Sons

Originally established in Birmingham in 1864 as Grinsell & Bourne. When the partnership was dissolved in 1871 John Grinsell started a new business with his four sons (Thomas Bywater Grinsell, James Erazmus Grinsell, Lorenzo Grinsell and Joseph Charles Grinsell) known as John Grinsell & Sons. The company operated out of Victoria Works, 57 tower street St. George's, Birmingham and they had showrooms in London and Glasgow. In 1905 the firm was changed to John Grinsell & Sons Ltd and was eventually purchased by Barker Ellis & Co Ltd.

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John Langford II & John Sebille

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John Robins

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John Round & Sons Ltd

Established in 1847 by John Round in Sheffield working out of a small workshop attached to the side of his house in Tudor Street.rnThe business proved successful and the John went into partnership with his son Edwin, and the company worked under the title John Round.

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John Turrill

John Turrill of 52 New Bond Street, London was a famous maker of dressing cases, Writing desks, Work boxes and leather travelling cases from 1834 - 1856

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Keith Murray

Keith Murray was a renowned designer who worked in field of glass, ceramics and metalware from 1920 to 1939. He trained and worked as an architect until the late 1920s when the great depression forced him to seek work elsewhere. Murray ended up working freelance for Brierley Hill and part time for Wedgewood. His metalwork was for the firm Mappin & Webb in silver and silver-plate. The designs were mostly geometric and modern in form.

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Lee & Wigfull

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Leuchars

Leuhchars of 47 Piccadilly, London established in 1794 by James Leuchars. The business moved to 38 Piccadilly in 1820 shortly before James Leuchars Died in 1822. James’ Widow, Lucy Leuchars, continued the business. In 1837 the firm received a royal warrant for the supply of dressing cases to the royal family.

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Liberty & Co

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Lund

Thomas Lund had established his London Business in 1804. In 1835 his son William Lund opened his own retail outlet on Fleet Street, London. In 1845 Thomas passed away and William would go on to run both businesses. His son Charles took over the business when William died in 1872 and continued to operate under the name William Lund & Son.

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M. Chapman, Son & Co Ltd

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Mappin & Webb

John Newton Mappin and his brother in law George Webb started an electroplating and cutlery firm in 1868. The firm had a large showroom on Norfolk street which displayed the silverware and electroplate. By 1897 the company was granted a Royal Warrant. In the 1980s the firm was taken over by Asprey & Co, but was later sold to the Jewellers Goldsmith group. Today Mappin & Webb is silversmith to Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth and the Prince of Wales Prince Charles.

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Milivoj Uzelac

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Millar & Beatty

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Moreau & Lang

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Ortner & Houle

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Parkins & Gotto

William Parkins and Henry Jenkin Gotto established Parkins & Gotto in London around 1845 and were originally stationer supplying paper and printing services. As the company grew they expanded into neighbouring premises on Oxford street, and started supplying various items including boxes ranging from tea caddies to writing cases. They experienced success through offering a wide range of items and all prices so there was something for everyone. The company ceased trading around the the turn of the century.

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Paul Sormani

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Pierre Gillois

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Piers Hart

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Puddefoot, Bowers, & Simonett Ltd

162-172 Kennington Road, London, SE11. Telephone: Reliance 3071. Cables: 'Puddefoot, London'. Showroom: 92 Regent Street, London, W1. 1947 Listed Exhibitor - British Industries Fair. Brushmakers, Silversmiths and Cabinet Makers in Ivory, Tortoiseshell, Fancy Hardwoods, Onyx and Shagreen.

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Rene Lalique

Master glassmaker René Lalique (1860–1945) created his stunning car mascot (bouchons de radiateur) designs between 1925 and 1931. Their production ceased in 1940, a year after WWII had begun. René’s factory, Verrerie d’Alsace, in Wingen-sur-Mode was forced to close following German occupation of the Alsace region. René sadly passed away in May 1945, so did not live to see the end of the war, nor the subsequent re-opening of the factory by his son Marc. Marc resumed production of his father’s famous mascot designs using the original steel moulds which had the fortune of being preserved, in spite of the war. These post-war productions, however, were sold as paperweights and desk accessories. From the late 1800s, motor car production, design and technology quickly gathered pace. The invention of the Internal Combustion Engine was to transform motoring forever. A more reliable and user-friendly engine, it required cooling to eliminate overheating; this was achieved via a radiator topped with a cap, its grille visible to the front of the car. Initially caps were just caps! Simply a plain, functional component of the car radiator. But as motoring evolved into a more glamorous affair, the car became the ultimate status symbol, with owners desiring more options for decoration and personalisation, fuelling demand for a car mascot, or hood ornament. The first known car mascot is believed to have been the brainchild of John Douglas-Scott Montagu, 2nd Baron Montagu of Beaulieu, British politician, and motoring enthusiast. Around 1899 he commissioned the sculptor Charles Sykes to create a bronze figure of St Christopher for display on his 12HP Daimler. Sykes later became famous for designing Lord Montagu’s further commission in 1909 of the iconic and widely known Spirit of Ecstasy mascot for his Rolls Royce Silver Ghost. The radiator cap was an ideal medium for artistic and decorative development and manufacturers were turning this little object into a much sought-after accessory in its own right. Starting with being topped with manufacturers’ emblems and logos, they evolved into more elaborate designs, the demand driven by the more wealthy car owner with a desire to show off their status, affluence and individual style. Catching on to the trend, René Lalique embarked on his creation of beautiful glass mascots, epitomising the style and grace of this exciting era. With a passion for the female form, flora and fauna, his designs came in various finishes, including clear, frosted, opalescent or coloured glass. His first official car mascot design, produced in August 1925, was the “Cing Chevaux” (Five Horses), commissioned by motoring magnate André Citroën. This was possibly to celebrate André’s new installation of the imposing and spectacularly illuminated Citroën emblem on the Eiffel Tower. Or perhaps to promote the renaming of his Type C “5HP” car (Horsepower) to “5CV” (Cheval Vapeur), following the change in calculation of taxable engine power in France. To meet the demands of a fast-expanding market, Lalique commissioned the Breves Gallery in London to develop a purpose-built mascot mount for cars - a very challenging task due to the delicate nature of René’s beautiful creations. Comprising metal collars and a rubber washer, the mounts also had various “upgrade” options. There was the option to illuminate your mascot, achieved by using a mount incorporating a bulb and plug that could be connected directly to the car wiring, or battery operated. Coloured illumination could also be selected, the effect created by use of a thick plastic filtre, sold in a variety of colours. But perhaps the most exciting and innovative option was speed-variable illumination …. achieved via a dynamo-fitted mount - your mascot would glow brighter the faster you drove! The demise of the glass car mascot occurred following newly imposed safety restrictions in the late 1940s. Huge transformations in car design in the 1950s eventually brought the fashion for all types of car mascot to an end. We are extremely proud to present this collection of René Lalique’s beautiful mascots which embody the style and glamour of what was undoubtedly motoring’s most exciting era. Today they are works of art in their own right, stunning, decorative accessories as well as a worthwhile investment.

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Richard Morton & Co

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Robert Hennell I

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Robert Wright

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Roberts & Belk

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Ruddspeed Ltd

Founded by Ken Rudd in 1945 working out of a disused stable in Worthing under the name K.N. Rudd (engineering) Ltd. Carrying out general engineering work and eventually graduating to work on sports cars. Around 1958 Ken formed Ruddspeed Ltd which was geared towards converting Austin Healeys, Alfas, Volvos and Ford Mustangs to Right Hand Drive. He would also work on one off projects and came up with the novel idea to create radiator grill decanters!

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S. Blackensee & Son Ltd

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Samuel Fisher

Fisher's was established in 1838 by Samuel Fisher and traded out of 188 Strand, London. The sold a wide range of items from travelling bags and trunks to billiard tables and stoves. Samuel died on 9th March 1890 and the business was passed onto his sons Robert Edward and Charles Alfred.

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Samuel Walton Smith

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Spiers & Son

Richard James Spiers was born in Oxford in 1806. In 1835 he established a shop, selling 'fancy good and articles of virtu', at 102 High Street, Oxford. The shop soon became well known for its Papier-mache souvenirs which were 'ornamented with views of every college & public building in Oxford'. This success meant Spiers could extend the shop to include 103 High Street. After his death the business was continued by his sons, Samuel and Frank.

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Stower & Wragg Ltd

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Stuart Clifford & Co

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Stuart Dawson

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Thomas Johnson I

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Thomas Lane

Thomas Lane was a papier mache manufacturer of Greater Hampton Street, Birmingham. He also had showrooms in Birmingham and London which would sell a wide variety of papier mache items, many of which would be decorated with patent pearl glass and gem painted glass.

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Thomas Whitehouse

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Thomas Wimbush

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Tiffany & Co

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Val St Lambert

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Valerio Albarello

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W & J Milne

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W. C. Fuller

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W. H. Tooke

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Walker & Hall

George Walker established the business in sheffield, 1845. As an Assistant to Dr. John Wright, who had conducted important experiments on electroplating methods, Walker secured the royalty of electroplating for Sheffield. In 1853 the business was joined by Henry Hall and became 'Walker & Hall'.

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Wells & Lambe

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William Comyns & Sons

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William Hutton & Sons

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William Neal

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William Rudkins

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